Category Archives: Fantasy RPGs

Making A Warlock Work

After spending some time thoroughly reading through the character class options in the 5e PHB, something that really sticks out is the Warlock class. The Warlock is a magic user who gains access to spells and other powers by making a pact with a powerful entity, but not a god like a cleric or paladin. The player can choose from one of three entities as a patron; an archfey, a fiend or a Great Old One. Each patron has their own set of benefits they bestow on the player. It’s clear that the Warlock is not as powerful in magic as a Wizard or a Sorcerer. The Warlock spell list is not as expansive as either of those two classes. The Warlock also uses different rules for spell slots. This means that a Warlock character will never have the ability to cast as many spells as a Wizard or Sorcerer.
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The Fantasy Atheist

Most fantasy roleplaying games are set in worlds where the presence of gods is strongly felt. Source materials for these realms often detail times throughout history where the gods have directly interfered with the affairs of mere mortals. It is usually assumed that most characters in these games not only believe in the gods of these worlds, but also worship them to some degree. The most extreme case would be priests and paladins who are only able to tap into magic because of their devotion to a particular god. Fighters and other classes may also worship gods because of superstitious beliefs or just blind faith, but the gods have less of an impact on their activities. It could be said that every character in a fantasy RPG is religious to some extent, but is it possible to play an atheist character in these games? Continue reading The Fantasy Atheist

Don’t Give Up On Playing A Cleric

I’ve been hearing something disappointing lately; many players don’t enjoy playing a cleric. Clerics seem to be viewed as a necessary part of a group, but they are deemed by some as being an inferior class. The argument goes that their magic skills aren’t as powerful as a wizard and their fighting skills aren’t as good as a paladin. I have even heard of groups that completely eliminate the class altogether. Why bother including them when some healing potions can easily replace them? This is a shame since playing a cleric can be a lot of fun. I would even go as far to say that they are one of my favorite classes. I believe that building a cleric allows the player to flesh out a character’s personality much more than a class such as a fighter or a paladin. All the player has to do is ask themselves some questions about the cleric they are creating. Continue reading Don’t Give Up On Playing A Cleric

This Means War!

There comes a time when, no matter how well developed your characters are, no matter how exciting an adventure is and no matter how great your group of players is, your fantasy set RPG sessions may get a little stale. There are many ways to liven up these sessions, but one that I enjoy is fighting a war. There are plenty of preexisting tabletop games that allow you to command space armies or medieval armies, but what I’m suggesting is taking established PCs and having them command troops on the field of battle or survive the siege of a castle. The introduction of armies will give your players the opportunity to use strategy and be rewarded for it. Plus it can be a refreshing break from slaughtering kobolds and raiding treasure chests. Continue reading This Means War!

In Defense Of Secret Dice Rolls

I am fairly particular about how the dice are rolled in a role playing game. A DM or a player that doesn’t agree with my preferences can make or break a gaming session for me. One of my big pet peeves when it comes to dice are secret rolls. For those who don’t know what I’m talking about, secret dice rolls are instances where the DM rolls the dice, often on behalf of a player, and doesn’t immediately reveal the results. Secret dice rolls can create a needless barrier between the players and the DM. That’s why I usually avoid them. However there are instances where secret dice rolls make the game more realistic. Here are three examples. Continue reading In Defense Of Secret Dice Rolls