CritSuccess World’s Toughest Chainmail Dice Bag

image

Recently I embraced my Kickstarter addiction and backed a project that was very intriguing. I am an avid collector of RPG dice and always need more bags to keep them in. When I heard about CritSuccess’ World’s Toughest Chain Mail Dice Bag I was instantly on board. The project was successfully funded on February 11th and less than two weeks later I received my backer reward: one Black Steel Dice Bag.

Continue reading CritSuccess World’s Toughest Chainmail Dice Bag

Sun Tzu’s Art of RPG Combat: Terrain

images

We previously covered Chapter III and Chapter VI of Sun Tzu’s classic military treatise The Art of War. That means it must be time for Chapter X which covers terrain. Don’t try to figure out my system. Most DMs take terrain into consideration when running an RPG campaign, but we need to consider it as more than a tool for establishing the story setting. Terrain can also be turned into a weapon when running combat. Continue reading Sun Tzu’s Art of RPG Combat: Terrain

Sun Tzu’s Art of RPG Combat: Weak Points and Strong

images

Welcome to the second installment in our RPG combat analysis of Sun Tzu’s military treatise The Art of War. In the first post we discussed Chapter III, Attack By Strategem. This post will take a look at Chapter VI, Weak Points and Strong. This chapter advises generals how to exploit the weakness of an enemy and how to use tactics to turn strengths into weaknesses. This second part is especially useful when running monster combat since the party usually has a strength advantage. Continue reading Sun Tzu’s Art of RPG Combat: Weak Points and Strong

The Time I Fought Myself

When I was in High School I was in a group that played D&D on a regular basis. Aside from me there was Mike who had actually introduced me to roleplaying and our friend Brett. Mike’s younger brother Pete rounded out the group most sessions. We were pretty big on 2nd Edition AD&D back then (I still am because that edition is the shit! THAC0!!) and were starting to get into some of the other worlds like Ravenloft and Spelljammer. Mike and I were so into Spelljammer that we had gone through and created a custom smuggling ship and a crew of motley pirates to play. It was Firefly but on a wooden ship and several years before Firefly came out. We had built them mid-level to play some of the higher level Spelljammer modules and picked from races not traditionally used as PCs such as the Thri Kreen. They were a bad ass crew built to kick ass, but before they got a chance to star in their own adventures they were needed to break up a fight. Continue reading The Time I Fought Myself

Sun Tzu’s Art of RPG Combat: Attack By Stratagem

images

One thing that really bothers me are when DMs who don’t put any effort into running their combat encounters. They fill their campaigns with monsters that act more like vending machines for XP and treasure than real opponents. Intelligent monsters rush headlong into combat against the group without any hint of a combat strategy. This is unrealistic and it makes for boring combat. DMs don’t need to be retired generals in order to run great combat, but learning some military strategy can really benefit them. To this end I want to look at one of the most well-known texts of military strategy, Sun Tzu’s The Art of War, and highlight the lessons that can be applied to RPG combat. Continue reading Sun Tzu’s Art of RPG Combat: Attack By Stratagem

Don’t File Away Those Old Characters Just Yet

On a bookshelf somewhere in your house, tucked in between a dog-eared copy of an old Player’s Handbook and a copy of the Unearthed Arcana is a binder. It may be a simple cardstock pocket binder or it could be a fancy Trapper Keeper, but their purpose is always the same. They are a retirement home for old characters. From the first roll of a D6 during character creation we invest our time and love into these imaginary heroes. We guide them through epic adventures against impossible odds, but, like all things, their journeys eventually come to an end. It’s a sad inevitability for an RPG PC. They all fall victim to reaching max level or a player’s desire to run a new character. But, these characters don’t have to be put to pasture. They can still serve a valuable role in ongoing quests for glories . . . as NPCs. Continue reading Don’t File Away Those Old Characters Just Yet

Dungeon Master’s Screen Review

image

I received the new Dungeon Master’s Screen last week and wanted to give my thoughts on it. Let me preface all of this by saying that owning the Dungeon Master Screen is in no way necessary to DM a game. It is more of a nice to have accessory. To me a good DM screen needs to serve three functions. First, it needs to be pleasant to look at on the players’ side since they are going to spend plenty of time staring at it. Next it needs to adequately block the players’ view of what the DM is doing behind it. Finally, the screen should include useful information on the DM’s side for quick reference.

Continue reading Dungeon Master’s Screen Review

Why Isn’t There More Digital 5E?

A few events in my life over the last week inspired me to write this blog post. First off, I took my daughter to Books-A-Million on Saturday to replace a book that she left in Las Vegas. While she perused the children’s book section I took the opportunity to check out the small RPG section in the store. Two products drew my interest: the 5th Edition Shadowrun Core Rulebook and the Pathfinder Core Rulebook. I was seriously thinking about picking them up, but ultimately decided not to. A few days after passing up on those books I finally downloaded all of the Torg content that I had purchased from the Bundle of Holding sale. It ended up being nineteen different PDFs that were included in that bundle. I put all of these documents directly on to my tablet with the other RPG downloads that I have. Continue reading Why Isn’t There More Digital 5E?

One-Shot Adventure: Capture A Dragon!

One-Shot Adventures provide adventuring hooks for stand-alone adventures that can be ran through in one or two gaming sessions or inserted into existing campaigns for a change of pace.

In most of the groups that I have run games for the players are very good at seeking out and destroying monsters. It is very satisfying for them to imagine their characters standing over the crumpled bodies of various creatures, wiping the blood from their weapons and hoping for treasure. I honestly have no issue running these types of combat encounters, but sometimes I like to give players a challenge that can’t be solved with murder. What if they were required to actually capture a creature instead of destroying it? Continue reading One-Shot Adventure: Capture A Dragon!

Should a DM Present Players With Impossible Situations?

Let me tell you a story about a game from about a decade ago. A group of friends were playing 2nd Edition AD&D and I was serving as the DM. During the course of the campaign, one of the players received a Deck of Many Things. I’m not a huge fan of the Deck of Many Things while I’m DMing. In my experience it has a tendency to completely grind the game to a halt since the players want to immediately draw from it. This is exactly what happened in this case, but it was already late in the session so we decided to draw from the deck and then wrap things up.
Continue reading Should a DM Present Players With Impossible Situations?

Running Terrible Games So You Don't Have To

%d bloggers like this:
Secured By miniOrange
Skip to toolbar