Tag Archives: DnD

Ships: Spelljammer 5e Conversion

Tradesman

Finally what everyone has been patiently waiting for from my Spelljammer 5e conversion. It’s time to go over ships! This post contains the updated stats for nineteen ships that originally appeared in the Spelljammer campaign box set. The conversion of ships from 2nd Edition AD&D rules to 5e was fairly straight forward with only a few modifications which I will explain as we go along. Since it’s a huge amount of information I’ve broken this post down into two parts.  Continue reading Ships: Spelljammer 5e Conversion

Spelljamming Clarified: Spelljammer 5e Conversion

I want to thank everyone for the comments on the last post. It’s always nice to know that I’m not just shouting into the void. One of the comments was a question about the use of highest available spell slot for determining Spelljamming Rating in the last post. It made me realize that I didn’t do a very good job of explaining why I made this decision. That’s kind of the point of these posts, right?
Continue reading Spelljamming Clarified: Spelljammer 5e Conversion

Spelljammer 5E Conversion Introduction

sea-of-sorrows

One of my constant worries over writing on this RPG blog is that I don’t usually have anything to say about running games that someone else isn’t already saying more eloquently or louder than I ever could. However, one thing that no one else (that I know of at least) is writing about is converting 2e Spelljammer rules and adventures over to 5e. I finally found my niche! To that end I have decided to document my conversion of a Spelljammer campaign over to fifth edition. Hopefully, riches and worldwide fame will follow.

Continue reading Spelljammer 5E Conversion Introduction

Desert Bestiary: Nasnas and Lammasu

Desert mythology is full of legendary creatures that can be adapted into a fantasy RPG setting. Two new entries for the desert bestiary come right out of these tales of the desert. The Nasnas comes from Arabian myths and is traditionally portrayed as a type of djinn. I have transformed into a demon for the desert bestiary. From Mesopotamian mythology comes the lammasu. This creature has previously been adapted for use in D&D, but was left out of 5e. Continue reading Desert Bestiary: Nasnas and Lammasu

Desert Magic Items Part 1

Along with new classes, monsters and places to explore, new magic items will also be introduced into the desert campaign setting. Inspiration for these magic items is easy enough to find in Middle Eastern folk tales such as One Thousand and One Nights. Ahmed’s Opulent Tent and the Samarkand Apple are two such items. Continue reading Desert Magic Items Part 1

Desert Bestiary: Des’Qum, The Sand Warriors

Ages ago the struggle between the Plane of Air and the Plane of Earth spilled over into the Material Plane. The elemental armies of the two sides met in battle among the endless dunes of the desert. The ever-shifting sands may bear no scars from the hostilities, but the desert was changed none the less. Continue reading Desert Bestiary: Des’Qum, The Sand Warriors

The Desert Warlock

The Desert Warlock shares many of the same aspects and abilities as the traditional Warlock class, but do not serve any of the three types of patrons available in the Player’s Handbook. The Desert Warlock gains her power from the patronage of noble Djinn that reside in the Plane of Air. These rare Djinn have grown so powerful that they no longer accept their fate as servants. Instead they seek out Warlocks to serve them in their efforts to gain more power in the Plane of Air. Continue reading The Desert Warlock

Desert Bestiary Part 2: Jhalan Umeed

In the language of the nomadic desert clans Jhalan Umeed translates as “false hope.” The creature earned this name by the manner in which it feeds on prey. When seen in full the Jhalan Umeed resembles a gargantuan flat skate 30ft long from head to tail. The underside of its head is distinguished by a 10 ft. wide concave depression where the mouth should be and four large proboscises that resemble desert palms. Few travelers witness the creature in full though. The Jhalan Umeed buries its long body upside down in the sand leaving only its proboscis and head depression exposed. Glands in the head excrete a powerful neurotoxin that fills the depression. To its unsuspecting prey the Jhalan Umeed appears to be a welcome oasis in the vast sea of desert. Targets that drink from the “pool” are paralyzed. Once the creature feels movement stop it uses one of its proboscis to grab the victim. Powerful muscles in the proboscis swallow the prey, crushing bones and armor, allowing the Jhalan Umeed to slowly drain the bodily fluids from the body. The Jhalan Umeed will have a body in 1d4-1 of its proboscises at any given time. Once the bodies are completely drained the creature expels the remains and buries them nearby. Continue reading Desert Bestiary Part 2: Jhalan Umeed

Variant Method For Rolling Ability Scores

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The way that ability scores are rolled in D&D has always seemed a little strange to me. For a normal character with no bonuses the scores rolled with D6 should range from 3 to 18. This puts the mid point at a 10 which makes sense. An ability score of 10 or 11 provides no bonuses and carries no penalties. It’s average. The issue that I have is the scores that fall in the below average range. Continue reading Variant Method For Rolling Ability Scores

Sun Tzu’s Art of RPG Combat: Terrain

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We previously covered Chapter III and Chapter VI of Sun Tzu’s classic military treatise The Art of War. That means it must be time for Chapter X which covers terrain. Don’t try to figure out my system. Most DMs take terrain into consideration when running an RPG campaign, but we need to consider it as more than a tool for establishing the story setting. Terrain can also be turned into a weapon when running combat. Continue reading Sun Tzu’s Art of RPG Combat: Terrain